Category Archives: Recommended by Will

Sing Street — February 2018



For the month of February, we watch “Sing Street,” a 2016 Irish moving picture streaming on Netflix about a boy who tries to impress a girl by forming a band. Will likes that the development of the characters’ musical talents seems realistic. It also has a message that resonates with him. He thinks it’s a film, but the others disagree. Will he be able to convince them? Luke, Tito and Will discuss. Then they come up with their own band name.

Up next for March 2018, Luke recommends “Arrival,” which is streaming on Amazon Prime.

Outro song: “Funk,” by Podington Bear
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution Non-Commercial 3.0
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/


The Founder — November 2017



For the month of November, Luke, Tito and Will talk about “The Founder,” which is on Netflix. It’s a 2016 biopic directed by John Lee Hancock and starring Michael Keaton as Ray Kroc, the businessman behind the expansion of McDonald’s into what we know of it today. Will points out that there is very little character development in Kroc — if any at all. What kind of takeaway does this leave the audience, who grows from watching the film more so than the characters do?

Coming up in December is Luke’s recommendation, “A Muppet Christmas Carol,” which you can find on HBO.

Outro song: “Funk,” by Podington Bear
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution Non-Commercial 3.0
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/


Seeking a Friend for the End of the World — August 2017



Luke, Tito and Will discuss “Seeking a Friend for the End of the World.” The 2012 dramedy was written and directed by Lorene Scafaria, who wrote “Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist,” and stars Steve Carrell and Keira Knightley. They compare this moving picture to The Lobster and Her, the two latest discussions, and talk about how this one fell short. How important is character development to a compelling narrative, and how can plot devices take away from that narrative?

For the month of September, Luke recommends “Circle on Netflix.” The 2015 thriller should not be confused with “The Circle,” which came out this year and stars Tom Hanks and Emma Watson.

Outro song: “Funk,” by Podington Bear
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution Non-Commercial 3.0
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/


Cloud Atlas — May 2017



Luke, Tito and Will discuss the 2012 German-American epic “Cloud Atlas,” directed by the Wachowskis and Tom Twyker, famous for The Matrix and Run Lola Run, respectively. They try to determine whether the moving picture is a flick, movie or film. Will and Tito feel one way, and Luke disagrees. Will presents the moving picture as a symphony featuring six moving parts that all work together to tell one story with one overall message: the actions that we take determine what role we play in our lives and the lives of others. Tito sees elements of Buddhism in the moving picture. Luke believes the message of the moving picture is that all actions or drops in the proverbial ocean are of equal importance or size, with which he disagrees.

Up next is Luke’s recommendation, “The Lobster,” which can be found on Amazon Prime.

Outro song: “Funk,” by Podington Bear
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution Non-Commercial 3.0
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/


The Hunt – February 2017



Luke, Tito and Will discuss Will’s recommendation, “The Hunt,” which is a 2012 Danish drama film starring Mads Mikkelson on Netflix. They try to determine if the moving picture is a flick, movie or film. They talk about the terrifying nature of the film’s narrative and how it can be applied to any similar situation around the world — and to other situations as well.

Up next is Luke’s recommendation, “Rushmore,” which can be found on HBO Go/HBO Now.

Outro song: “Funk,” by Podington Bear
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution Non-Commercial 3.0
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/


The Truman Show — November 2016



Luke, Tito and Will discuss the 1998 satirical science-fiction feature, “The Truman Show,” starring Jim Carrey and directed by Peter Weir. The three agree the moving picture has a negative view of humanity’s media consumption and perhaps on art and artists, but they cannot agree on the classification of the moving picture as a flick, movie or film.

For the month of December, Luke recommends “The Babadook” on Netflix.

Outro song: “Funk,” by Podington Bear
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution Non-Commercial 3.0
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/